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Using Android Outside the Mobile Phone Space

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A few years back all embedded devices were designed like PCs. For example, users understood the use of a mouse and keyboard and could minimize and maximize a window using mouse clicks and launch new applications from Start. The increasing demand and usage of smartphones globally has not just changed the definition of user experience for embedded equipments but has made emerging technologies like touch and display panels, connectivity solutions and infrastructure, affordable to non- phone products segments. The embedded equipment designers and users have grown accustomed in no time to the smartphone features and technologies like multi-touch, high-resolution display panels, connectivity over 3G and Bluetooth, high capacity storage and medium and low power. For example, today, a machine operator needs a pinch-zoom feature on his HMI to resize a graph plot, a child using rear seat entertainment wants to play a touch-screen video game and users want the device to be smart and connected. According to Gartner, the smartphone sales increased 42 percent last year. Android’s share of the worldwide smartphone market was 52.3 percent for Q3 2011, double from what it was a year ago. This proves that Android is growing to become the number one OS distribution for smartphones. Android by its rich user experience, open source development model, neatly integrated software stack, commercial and community friendly software licensing, vast app and embedded eco-system and above all based on Linux Kernel, fits many embedded products that don’t belong to mobile or tablet segments. This talk highlights the benefits & advantages of Android for embedded segments and gives an overview of limitations and challenges in taking Android outside of mobile phone space. Agenda * Overview of Android’s growth in mobile space * Android’s influence in non mobile space * Advantages of Android with examples * Challenges in porting Android to non mobile products * Limitations of Android for non mobile space * Benefits of open collaboration on Android for non-mobile devices Jason Kridner, Texas Instruments Jason Kridner is the chief software architect for the Sitara ARM microprocessor business at Texas Instruments (TI) and the community development manager. Jason began in DSP applications as a hardware developer, working on board, FPGA, and ASIC designs. Using his software experience prior to TI, Jason transitioned to lead software development of low-power media software, audio processing, file systems, USB drivers, digital rights management, and video codecs. As one of the founders of the BeagleBoard.org project, Jason is seeking to make web appliances something that electronics hobbyists can put together on their own and customize however they desire. Jason has presented in CES (panel), multiple ARM developer conferences, MontaVista Vision, numerous ESC events, LugRadio Live, and in on-line and community developer events. Khasim Syed Mohammed, Texas Instruments Khasim Syed Mohammed is a Technical Lead for Android development (non-phone segments) at Texas Instruments (TI). He leads the Android development efforts for non-mobile segments with TI’s Sitara™ ARM® microprocessors and DaVinci™ digital media processors. Khasim started his career in 2001 with Linux devices for Single board computers and TI DSP applications and solutions. Khasim has contributed more than 150 patches to OMAP Linux community and has pioneered various initiatives in TI to meet the increase in demand for Open source distributions on Linux & Android on multiple TI chipsets and processors. He is a core team member of beagleboard.org and arowboat.org open communities. Khasim earned a Bachelor’s in computer science and engineering in 2001 from BMS college of Engineering, Bangalore, India.

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  • Greg Neely Said:

    This video won't play. All you have is a black screen, with no video.